Long Live Stockwell

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[et_pb_section][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_video admin_label="Video" src="https://vimeo.com/122013161" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" text_line_height="2em" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Stockwell is a skatepark unlike any other. It’s a graffiti-laden canvas in the heart of Brixton that’s been home to a buzzing community of skaters, musicians and eccentric characters since 1978. It may be known by many different names – Brixton Beach, Stocky, Stockers, Stockwell Sands, Brixton Bowls, The Well, The Beach, The Office and The Park – but it is loved by all.

Stockwell is an example of how a skatepark can become part of the fabric of a community and a lot can be learnt from its vibrant history. It started life as a sandy-coloured sugar bowl, big bowl and snake run and then in ’95, the park was painted red by Matt McMullan (RIP) and Gnarly Tom and the sausage ramp and mound with stairs were installed. This era was fondly remembered by locals as a time when they built shaky ledges, quarterpipes and banks to skate.

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But this all changed in 2007 when Jeremy Donaldson, a local ripper and architect, spearheaded a major redesign. A new bowl section, ledge, Jersey Barrier and some quarterpipes were added, but the updates fitted the locals needs perfectly. “It’s a unique spot,” says longtime local Andy Lindsay. “It’s an old school park with a new upgrade that fits seamlessly into the overall design and it offers something to all abilities. Due to its layout the place can accommodate a large amount of people skating at one time.”

Stockwell locals have a unique approach to skating the park. Its not about landing the biggest tricks but riding fast and landing tricks with style whilst still maintaining flow. “It’s a constant motion park,” says Adrian French, founder of Witchcraft Skateboards. And Descent Skateboards owner, Chris Pulman agrees: “I remember it being kind of endless.”

Read the whole story here.

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