Posts tagged Culture
The New York Public Library Now Lets You Read Classic Novels on Instagram

Insta Novels is a new project from the New York Public Library that brings classic reads to your phone via Instagram Stories. You don’t need a library card to read them; all you have to do is head to @nypl and browse the selection in their saved stories, though you may want to wait because right now it’s only Alice in Wonderland. Still, we’re very excited, as the artwork for the animated covers looks incredible and there are no late fees for us anymore. Yes, there are limitations. As far as we know, there’s no way to save your place and pick it up later, so you’re basically committing yourself to a full book in one sitting—or at least one large chunk of a book, since they broke Alice in Wonderland into two parts. Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is on the way along with other works, so give them a follow and let your commutes get a whole lot more imaginative.

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This Short Film is Full of Emotional Anarchy

You know why that security footage of an office worker throwing the printer out of a top floor window is so hilarious? Because we’ve all wanted to do it. And if I had a dollar for every time I’ve wanted to slap some loud-talking moron’s phone onto the floor, I’d have enough for that pair of A-grade noise cancelling headphones from Bose that I’ve been angling for for months now, to no avail.

Like a bald Britney Spears trying to mutilate a car window with an umbrella, humans abandoning all form of self-control and partaking in a little emotional anarchy is one of the highest forms of entertainment known to man, which is why two-minute short film Enough is just so good. Director Anna Mantzaris’ cute but dismal characters decide to throw social decorum (and at times, their computers) out of the window, in the most relatable of social situations.

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The Fight to Save Europe’s Remaining Wild Rivers

Patagonia tend to be the ones towing the bandwagon that other companies jump on board, and legendary environmentalist/activist Yvon Chouinard’s Patagonia funding of projects that draw attention to the myriad of threats to the natural world is unparalleled in a company of its size. The latest of which, Blue Heart, is a wonderful piece of journalism that documents the struggle to save Europe’s remaining wild rivers from being turned into hydropower plants—a so-called renewable energy source that’s nowhere near as green as it’s been billed.

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Everywhere Unseen

This is the first in an ongoing series where MC sends a group of four photographers out into the world to see what they bring back. The idea is that while they’re all travelling to the same destinations, each photographer will have an individual take on their surroundings, providing four completely different points of view. Check out the first trailer below.

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Quiksilver's Mad Wax Capsule Brings Surfing's Heyday to the Masses

In 1987, iconic Aussie surf brand Quiksilver released a film that would capture the zeitgeist of an entire generation of boardriders. Titled Mad Wax, the style of the era was unique, as boards got shorter and tricks got more and more complex, surf culture became ingrained in parts of the world that hadn’t before seen such laidback vibes, and the scene surrounding beaches where the swell was big started to burgeon. Premiering at Sydney’s Enmore Theatre, champion surfer Ross Clarke Jones starred in the lead role, alongside Tom Carroll and Gary Elkerton, while the whole production was directed by Michael Hohensee. With a soundtrack from GANGgajang, the short film epitomised an entire era of surfing life, which Australia largely helped to create. It was also the first time surf started to become as much a fashion statement as it was a sport, or hobby.

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Mitch King and Penny Collaboration Keeps Psychedelia Alive

Psychedelia and all its associations have been an ingrained part of Southern Californian surf and skate culture since the 60s.

The Brotherhood of Eternal Love being it’s most famous Californian export. If you’re unfamiliar with the BOEL then you need to watch Orange Sunshine. Long story short, the near-mythical gang was an integral part of the Summer of Love and aimed to “turn on the world” through exposing it to LSD. The means to this end was to become the largest network of smugglers, buyers and distributors of acid the world had ever seen. Eventually, it all went predictably pear-shaped, but it’s a radical story in every sense of the word. 

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Japan's Dekotora Movement is Fading

If you find yourself driving down a highway in Japan, you might pass what looks like an actual Transformer. No, you're not crazy. These tricked-out transports belong to a niche DIY semi truck culture called dekotora, in which long-haul drivers add custom graphics, lights and swag to their vehicles on a level that goes way beyond a couple decals. With some dekotora customizations costing up to $100,000, many of these dedicated DIY designers see their vehicles as spiritual extensions of their identity. Photographer Todd Antony is giving you a better look at these mobile light shows through a series of photographs that capture both the trucks and their owners. The trend began back in the ’70s after a movie franchise showcased elaborate trucks. Aspiring stars began decorating their big rigs in hopes that they might get cast. It snowballed into a movement that has only recently begun to fade. Have a look at Antony’s shots here.

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Sailor Jerry and the Infinite Wisdom of Tattooing

Once synonymous with outlaws and misfits, servicemen and the occasional murderous preacher, tattoos are now so mainstream that every second supermodel has one. Makes you wonder what Norman ‘Sailor Jerry’ Collins would think of it all. A tough-talkin’ former itinerant and naval seaman, Sailor Jerry reimagined twentieth-century tattoo art from his shop in Honolulu’s rowdy red-light district during World War II. In the name of happy, regret-free tattooing for both artist and client, Here is some pearls of wisdom from the man who started it all. (Even the cleanskins among us could follow worse advice.)

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Some New Zealanders Built an Island to Avoid an Alcohol Ban

Homer J. Simpson said it best when he proclaimed, “To alcohol! The cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems!” That phrase was put on display in New Zealand recently, as a group of residents built a makeshift island out of sand to avoid the ban on drinking alcohol in public places. As reported by BBC, the people who built the island enjoyed New Year’s Eve with a few cold ones under the fireworks in “international waters.”

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Elliott Routledge's Strange Oasis

Elliott Routledge (or as most know him, Numskull) is a name synonymous with Sydney's contemporary art scene.Living in Sydney, it’s almost impossible not to have come across his work. Splashed across walls, adorning the sides of one of the city’s most visible universities, and exhibited in countless galleries, Elliott’s work is instantly recognisable.

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The Electronic Alphabet

Vinicius Araujo is a Rio de Janeiro-based designer who has taken a collection of well-known brands and turned them into a font. While it’s not exactly usable for drafting a Word document, it is fun to look at. The first letter of each brand’s name is used to spell out the alphabet, so you have Apple for “A,” Beats for “B,” Canon for “C”, and so on. Araujo made sure each letter looked like a product the brand would create, down to the flashing load screen of a Dell PC running Windows XP and the old, clunky build of a Motorola. Take a scan through all the letters and see how many you can figure out. 

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