Posts tagged Interior Design
Black Shed House

Set amongst the rugged landscapes of the Isle of Skye, the Black Shed House is a minimalist tribute to the area's agricultural heritage. A simple gabled silhouette is consistent with the classic Scottish blackhouses used by farmers to escape the harsh weather. Clad in corrugated aluminum, the facade resembles agrarian buildings throughout the region while its black hue offers a contemporary revision. Unlike most modern homes, the walls aren't full of expansive glazing. Instead, the interior takes a more traditional approach with thoughtfully placed openings that take advantage of incoming sunlight. Paired with the Douglas fir lining, the interior becomes a warm, intimate refuge.

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Shinola Hotel

 Set in Downtown Detroit, the Shinola Hotel extends the brand's timeless style to the hospitality business. 129 guest rooms are spread over eight floors, including new construction and spaces that once served as stores. In addition to the expected Shinola products, you'll find marble tubs, terraces, and perhaps even a fireplace among the more than 50 room configurations. Also on-site are a public-accessible "living room", a mezzanine bar — named Saksy's, after the bar owned by partner Dan Gilbert's father — a ballroom, and a conservatory. Part of the company's ongoing investment in Detroit, the hotel is the cornerstone of a new development that is home to multiple eateries and shops, meaning you won't have far to go to find everything you need.

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Platform House

Situated on a triangular lot in Sydney, the Platform House mimics its geometric site with a dramatic angular design. The home, or platform for living as Studioplusthree likes to call it, is made up of a pair of stacked volumes. Its lower level is housed in a while shell and consists of four bedrooms. Perched above, the contrasting charred cypress unit places the main living area in the treetops. It's interior is light and airy, an atmosphere created by a pale palette and loads of natural light. Carefully placed windows frame in the verdant scenery while sliding doors open to a north-facing deck. Cantilevering over the ground floor, the upper floor creates shelter for the garden terrace below.

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First Lessons House

For architect Ray Dinh, the First Lessons House is just that. The home is his debut project after going solo and is a practice in mastering the basics. Part of that was creating a design that responds to its landscape along with the owner's needs which included an abundance of exterior space to take advantage of views of Australia's Portsea lagoon and wildlife reserve. The result is a charred blackbutt, concrete, and corrugated iron structure with seamless indoor/outdoor living. Large sliding glass doors aid in this transition, allowing for unobstructed views of the garden when closed and direct access to the central terrace when open. Acting as more of an extension of the interior rather than a separate space, the deck features its own dining table and BBQ for summer dinners and a sitting area organized around the double-sided fireplace.

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True North House

Many structures draw inspiration from the landscape that surrounds them but the True North House from Alain Carletakes a very unique approach. Due to the fact that the home is surrounded by manmade scenery created by the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway in Canada, it instead mimics the horizon by aligning its linear layout with the north cardinal axis (hence, true north).

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Alpine Terrace House

The Alpine Terrace House is a true minimalist home located in Wakatipu Basin, New Zealand, designed by Fearon Hay. The home is a cluster of blackened buildings set around a courtyard. While the outlook is spectacular, the elements can be harsh – the perimeter of the cluster provides a sanctuary from which to experience the alpine surroundings. The enclosure is formed with a palette of timber, steel, metal and stone, all in dark tones to a form a large silhouette.

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Bruny Island Hideaway Cabin

Inspired by minimalist Japanese homes, the Bruny Island Hideaway Cabin by Maguire and Devine Architects is an off-grid sanctuary isolated from the noisy city life. Sitting in the middle of lush foliage off the southern coast of Tasmania, this contemporary compact cabin is a perfect place to slow down and enjoy life.

Taking a look inside, the interior only features built-in furniture with the exceptions of the low table and mattress in the upper level. The ground floor of the cabin contains a kitchen, living room, study, bathroom, day bed, and laundry area. Making your way up the ladder to the loft, you’ll find a peaceful sleeping space. Massive windows and sliding doors all around the cabin open up to nature, offering fantastic views of the landscape. There are also two decks to help the owner relax with one of the decks featuring a built-in bath. The cabin utilizes a rainwater collection system, solar panels, and a skylight to invite natural light into the living space, as well as sticking to the client’s brief to keep the dwelling environmentally friendly.

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Teton County House

Built on the remote wetlands of Idaho, the Teton County House was designed to respect the diverse ecosystem that inhabits the land on which it sits. The home features a small footprint, with its exterior clad in local stone and timber, a combination that compliments the natural scenery. Internally, the home presents a reverse layout with guests rooms on the ground floor and the main living area and master on the second level. This arrangement allows for prime viewing of the pristine landscape from behind the floor-to-ceiling windows. The glazed facade opens to a terrace covered by the oversized roof, creating an outdoor shelter to take in the surrounding mountain peaks.

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Rose Coast House

Placed among the wild roses of St. Andrews By-the-Sea, the Rose Coast House is a New Brunswick retreat overlooking Passamaquoddy Bay. The home takes shape as a traditional Irish farmhouse, an ode to the owner's family heritage. It's organized as a series of interconnected gabled volumes, with the private areas occupying one side and the public spaces on the other. The two wings are joined by a glass walkway while locally quarried stone and milled cedar clad the remainder of the exterior. As you pass through the interior, the same rustic material palette runs throughout giving the retreat an authentic cottage feel. At the rear, the inside opens up to the exterior with a full-height glazed facade. The walls of windows not only flood the living spaces with natural light but also expose it to views across the bay.

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Silo House

A 1955 grain silo transitions into a new phase as a two-story tiny home. Located in Arizona, USA, in Phoenix's Garfield Historic District, the corrugated steel shell retains its original agrarian form. New openings break up the formerly opaque facade, giving the structure a more residential aesthetic. Inside, any trace of grain has been completely wiped out and replaced with 340-square-feet of living space. The circular ground floor is occupied by a kitchen, sitting room, and dining area. A curved sliding glass door washes the room in natural light while expanding the modest interior to an outdoor terrace. A black metal spiral staircase leads to a lofted bedroom. Lined entirely in walnut millwork, the room is a warm, inviting place to cozy up for the night.

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Arctic Fox Igloos

Situated on the shores of Lake Ranuanjärvi, the Arctic Fox Igloos puts you front and centre for Finland's nightly phenomenon. Rooms are located in a glass dome-like structure offering a kitchenette and double bed. Facing the lakeshore, each one is immersed in the arctic landscape while its remote setting makes it a prime location for viewing the Northern Lights. A timber box on the forest side of the cabin houses a bathroom and a private sauna. Although the views are surreal, there's plenty more to do than gaze into the snowy abyss. The property offers a series of arctic safaris where guests can explore the wilderness on snowmobiles, huskies, or reindeer. During the warmer months, take a fatbike tour of the Ranua forests, meet the local polar bears, or canoe across the lake right out your front door.

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A Backyard Eucalyptus Becomes the Muse For This Home

When architect Fiona Dunin was tasked with simplifying and modernizing a Melbourne home, she looked to the backyard for inspiration. The main objective was to create living spaces with a strong connection to the landscape, and access to extensive natural light. But the simplicity is in the bigger picture, and not in its layered finishes. The running details of brick and wood are what give this house its character, and connect it to its history and views. The brick reinforces our own determined appreciation for the house's original brickwork, and the beams reference the old gnarled Mallee river red-gum eucalyptus at the rear of the property. Its bent form mirrors the form of the ceiling, almost like branches.

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This Home is Sustainable and Tiny

Standing out amongst its humble suburban neighbours, House A by Whispering Smith is an experiment in modern living that’s proven to be successful for the director of the architecture firm, Kate Fitzgerald, and her partner. House A demonstrates that affordable, environmentally-friendly and beautiful homes can exist when spaces are used in innovative and carefully considered ways. House A is the first of three homes to be built by the architects on the one block of land. House B and C are in the development stages and will be guided by the same building principles and ethos, but will have their own unique designs. Sustainability and longevity were high priorities

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Minimalist Living in the Randwick House

The Randwick house is the creation of Ben Giles Architect and was created in 2017. Based in Randwick, Australia, the home is owned by a retired couple who wanted a homely space for when they weren’t touring the country. The space integrates the house with the garden, which is located on the southern side of the site that creates a lineal garden along the northern side. The living spaces are designed to be visually connected, using high ceilings to create the idea of a larger space. The roof is also articulated in order to mitigate low-angle summer sun, avoiding light making the interior uncomfortable.

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This House Brings Nature In

The latest home to catch our attention is the Goldtree House. Created by Hartree + Associates, the space is based in East Fremantle and the key aim was according to the architects, to “deliver agile spaces hosting a family celebrating teenage twins.” To do this, they wanted to maximize views of the nearby harbour and add more space by removing the roof and adding another level to the building that would host the main living space and master bedroom. Take a look through the gallery to see more of the home.

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Five Element House

Perched on a hilltop overlooking India's Pavana Lake, the Five Element House is a direct response to the surrounding landscape. The fort-like structure is comprised of a series of units organized around a central courtyard. Its wintergreen facade references the earth, helping to blend the exterior into its surroundings.

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Molesworth Street House

Occupying a narrow lot in Kew, Australia, the Molesworth Street House transforms an Edwardian period home into a modern marvel. The location of the existing house was plagued with obstacles, setting the stage for a long extension. Utilizing the original structure's entrance hallway, the new construction expands through the slim lot. The new addition offers a statement staircase and wine wall, an internal light court, and a main living area in the rear fitted with contemporary styling and sleek clean lines. Rotating screens open to expose panels of glass that fill the tunnel-like volume with natural light while bi-fold doors open to a backyard terrace.

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Chameleon Villa

Just as its name implies, the Chameleon Villa disguises itself to blend into the lush Bali landscape. The home is built on a steep slope. Its concrete facade emerges from the mountainside like an ancient temple. Draped in greenery, its clean lines fade away. The interior draws inspiration from traditional Balinese architecture, comprising itself of multiple pavilions. Each one houses a different function, allowing them to flow freely or be closed off as desired. To further immerse the structure in the natural setting, floor-to-ceiling glazing lets in views of the surrounding forest in while also drawing guest out to a series of balconies and terraces.

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North Avoca Studio

The North Avoca Studio pretty much defies the odds of architecture, it sits cantilevered on a hill, seeming to float above greenery and ocean views. Located in Sydney, Australia, the extremely unique house is a multi-purpose space where the owners can comfortably work, relax, meditate and entertain. Designed by architect Matt Thitchener, the 650-square-foot cube home was sustainably built and was constructed in the middle of difficult geotechnical conditions, affixed to the side of a hill that overlooks the Pacific Ocean. The roof is covered in solar panels, which provide 100% of its energy, and it is also equipped with a rain harvesting system that is used to irrigate the garden planted under the structure.

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Iceland's Blue Lagoon Retreat Hotel is Paradise in the Northern Hemisphere

Iceland’s otherworldly volcanic landscape has always needed a truly first-rate luxury resort from which to roam, and the arrival of the Retreat at Blue Lagoon hits all the marks. Located on a private inlet of the titular lagoon, the 62-room property is actually an extension of an earlier complex, but Basalt Architects and Design Group Italia have created a natural transition that blends a concrete superstructure the colour of dark grey lava, with terrazzo, sand, water features and moss. The 62 suites, in particular, feature a quietly rugged mood of walnut and lava surfaces, though the marquee attraction has to be the view of Iceland’s wildly rocky beauty seen through the floor-to-ceiling windows.

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